Book Reviews

Note: The book reviews below are merely Clayton Morgan’s opinion on the books and are protected under free speech. The reviews given may or may not reflect that of popular opinion.

Currently Reading: HEX—by Thomas Olde Heuvelt 

I’m not a fan of the standard rating system using 5 stars. To me, rating a horror book is just not that simple. In my mind, a horror book has 5 different categories on which to be reviewed.

  • Characters
  • Originality
  • Scary
  • Suspenseful
  • Gruesome 

However, reviewing a book in this manner would likely ensure that no book would ever receive 5 stars, in addition, many authors may not appreciate their books being reviewed in that fashion. So, to keep it fair and simple, at horrorfictionbooks.com, books are given between 3 and 5 bloody axes.

5- Exceptional— Epic read/hard to top this book/highly recommend it 

4- Great— A page turner/peaked my interest/definitely recommend it

3- Very Good— Well worth the read/I recommend it

Below 3 is irrelevant, I don’t review books that I can’t recommend.    

Helltown—by Jeremy Bates

      

 

 

 

This book barely makes the cut with 3 bloody axes, it’s just engaging enough that I finished it. As the thrills escalate, they are too often dampened by off tangent tales into the lives of the characters. However, the story does have its moments, after all, it contains deranged, redneck, Satan worshiping freaks who hold black masses and sacrifice women. Sounds like great horror to me!

 

 

A Winters Sleep—by Greg F. Gifune

I absolutely loved this book. A weird, madly driven tale. Reading this is like looking through the eyes of a highly intellectual, mad person. Ben, the main character, and I dare not call him the protagonist, is running from his past. He ends up trapped by a snowstorm at a hotel that houses the most peculiar residence, him being one of them.                      A must-read psychological horror.

They Came With the Snow—by Christopher Coleman

This story engages right away and reads incredibly smooth from start to finish. Coleman creates a vivid reading experience with minimal words. Fast paced and only 40 pages long, this book left me wishing I had ordered the sequel with it.

River of Ghosts—by Gaby Triana

I love tales of pirates and their ships, so this book peaked my attention from the beginning. Infused with mystery and suspense, and containing vivid, believable characters, River of Ghosts is an intriguing haunted house/ghost story that delivers all the way to the end. Very imaginative and engaging.

 

                                                                                                                                              Wildlife—by Jeff Menapace 

This book is well written, fast paced and fun! Jeff Menapace delivers a vivid reading experience with minimal description. The characters are very defined and keep this book rolling non-stop. Well worth the read.

                                                                                                                                                The Rib From Which I Remake The World—by Ed Kurtz                                   

I was intrigued with this book from the moment I started reading the prologue. Kurtz does a great job of building a barrage of broken characters and twining them together. Then, the story gets a little weird and a bit creepy, delving into the sinister realm of black magic. This is a very imaginative book and a fascinating concept.

                                                                                                                    Ancient Enemy—by Mark Lukens                   

                                       

Ancient Enemy starts out in the perfect setting for a horror story and jumps straight into action. The imagery driven throughout the book is vivid, the story is clear and easy to follow, making this book a page turner. There is a sequel entitled ‘Dark Wind’ and it’s a good thing, because it’s impossible not to wonder what becomes of the three surviving characters.

                                                       

 

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